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Research Article

Tracing the Source of Campylobacteriosis

  • Daniel J. Wilson mail,

    djw@uchicago.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Maths and Statistics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

    Current address: Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America

    X
  • Edith Gabriel,

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

    Current address: Université d'Avignon, IUT STID, Site Agroparc, Avignon, France

    X
  • Andrew J. H. Leatherbarrow,

    Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, United Kingdom

    X
  • John Cheesbrough,

    Affiliation: Preston Microbiology Services, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Preston, United Kingdom

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  • Steven Gee,

    Affiliation: Preston Microbiology Services, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Preston, United Kingdom

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  • Eric Bolton,

    Affiliation: Manchester Medical Microbiology Partnership, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom

    X
  • Andrew Fox,

    Affiliations: Preston Microbiology Services, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Preston, United Kingdom, Manchester Medical Microbiology Partnership, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom

    X
  • Paul Fearnhead,

    Affiliation: Department of Maths and Statistics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

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  • C. Anthony Hart †,

    † Deceased.

    Affiliation: Division of Medical Microbiology, School of Infection and Host Defence, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

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  • Peter J. Diggle

    Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

    X
  • Published: September 26, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000203

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Copy of the press release originally distributed on September 23, 2008

Posted by PLoS_Genetics on 03 Oct 2008 at 10:56 GMT

A study by researchers from Lancashire, England, and Chicago, IL found that 97 percent of campylobacteriosis cases sampled in Lancashire were caused by bacteria typically found in chicken and livestock. The work, which appears September 26 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, is based on DNA-sequence comparison of thousands of bacteria collected from human patients and animal carriers.

Campylobacter jejuni causes more cases of gastroenteritis in the developed world than any other bacterial pathogen, including E. coli, Salmonella, Clostridium, and Listeria combined. Wild and domestic animals act as natural reservoirs for the disease, which can also survive in water and soil. However, the relative importance of these sources is unclear, and recent work has suggested that livestock are not the main reservoir for human disease.

Researchers led by Daniel Wilson, of the University of Chicago, and formerly Lancaster University, United Kingdom, sequenced the DNA of bacteria collected from 1,231 patients and compared it to Campylobacter jejuni DNA sequences collected from wild and domestic animals, and the environment. They used evolutionary modeling to trace the ancestry of human C. jejuni back to one of seven source populations.

In 57 percent of cases, the bacteria could be traced to chicken, and in 35 percent to cattle. Wild animal and environmental sources were accountable for just three percent of disease.

“The dual observations that livestock are a frequent source of human disease isolates and that wild animals and the environment are not, strongly support the notion that preparation or consumption of infected meat and poultry is the dominant transmission route,” Wilson said.

Further studies are underway in the United States, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand to determine the generality of the result. But the authors say they hope the current study will add impetus to initiatives aimed at controlling food-borne pathogens.

CONTACT:
John Easton
John.Easton@uchospitals.edu


Press coverage

PLoS_Genetics replied to PLoS_Genetics on 03 Oct 2008 at 11:01 GMT

The following links provide access to some of the news/blog coverage since publication. The journal is not responsible for the content of external sites; some external sites may require registration to view the full article; readers are welcome to judge the merits of each piece, considered in conjunction with the open-access article (www.plosgenetics.org/doi/...) for themselves.

- The Sun (New York): http://www.nysun.com/heal...
- Bloomberg: http://www.bloomberg.com/...
- Grist Magazine: http://gristmill.grist.or...
- World Poultry: http://www.worldpoultry.n...